THE DIVEMASTER CV

HOW DO YOU BREAK INTO YACHTING WITH A SPECIALISM LIKE DIVING AND TRANSLATE YOUR EXPERIENCE TO SOMETHING A VESSEL WANTS OR NEEDS? We are looking at the CV of a divemaster searching for his first job in the luxury yachting industry. Our applicant is a very talented, versatile and well travelled candidate with lots to […]

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HOW DO YOU BREAK INTO YACHTING WITH A SPECIALISM LIKE DIVING AND TRANSLATE YOUR EXPERIENCE TO SOMETHING A VESSEL WANTS OR NEEDS?

We are looking at the CV of a divemaster searching for his first job in the luxury yachting industry. Our applicant is a very talented, versatile and well travelled candidate with lots to offer to his next employer. Let’s make sure all this transpires in his CV. There is always a fine balance between too little and too much information on a CV: What should one include? What should be removed and discussed face to face during an interview?

A CV has to be factual, informative and to the point with verifiable or traceable information.

PROFILE & OBJECTIVE

Most of us will struggle with this part. It is probably the hardest paragraph of a CV to write; hence it is the one that many get completely wrong. The fact it is such a critical part of the CV, the one that sets the tone, only aggravates the problem.
If you get it wrong, the reader will lose interest before even getting to the Experience section. So, how do you ensure your potential employer keeps on reading?

In a nutshell, you need to state what you are and what you can offer. This section can be very short, a few sentences suffice, even more so if you are at the beginning of your career. In this case, the Personal Profile section is good as it is; but let’s make it excellent.

GET TO THE POINT QUICKLY

To reiterate past CV Surgeries, on average a recruiter or potential employer will spend no more then 15 seconds reading your CV. This may not sound much but F1’s Lewis Hamilton could have changed his tyres four times in this timeframe. So, make the most of the 15 seconds you have: Get to the point quickly and communicate efficiently. The second to last sentence of our candidate’s CV should be his first: “I am looking for a deckhand/divemaster vacancy.” This is the hook; it is clear and concise and, if a captain has such a vacancy, he will read further. Our candidate is astute and has already understood that. He has clearly written DECKHAND/DIVE INSTRUCTOR just below his name and telephone number, achieving maximum visibility.

FIND EXAMPLES

Our candidate mentions “proven ability to adapt to any task”. This is a great statement but be ready to back that up with real examples of how you managed to adapt. If challenged on this matter during a face-to-face interview, be prepared to justify yourself.

This, by the way, goes for any broad statement you use on a CV. Our candidate has not mentioned it but I often read CVs that say: “I
am a hard working individual.” Fantastic, all employers want to hire hard working people. But you need to be able to clearly elaborate
on the matter if asked during an interview. Be ready to answer this question with confidence; hesitation or an embarrassingly long silence will not do. The core of the CV is well written; the previous work experience is informative, from the diving to the bricklayer to the Royal Marine Reserves; it’s all there.

A good CV is nothing but a canvas to get you an interview. And then it’s show time!