CV surgery 3

This regular feature explains how to better present a CV and shows where jobseeking crew can go wrong in all aspects of the CV writing process. This month Laurence Reymann is reviewing the CV of a commercially certified captain looking to make the transition to superyachts. Our candidate is a master mariner looking to make […]

This regular feature explains how to better present a CV and shows where jobseeking crew can go wrong in all aspects of the CV writing process. This month Laurence Reymann is reviewing the CV of a commercially certified captain looking to make the transition to superyachts.

shutterstock_342658142

Our candidate is a master mariner looking to make the transition to the luxury yachting. He has been working in the merchant navy for just over 20 years, so this transition is quite late in his professional career. It is therefore important that his objective section is convincing.

Objective

This section needs sharpening and I suggest having two CVs, one targeted at a first officer position and the other at a captain position. It is not advisable to have the two positions muddled together; it has to be one or the other. Our industry is the luxury yachting industry and not the “leisure/charter boat industry” , it is important to use the correct terminology.
This candidate already enjoys a successful career and is obviously very experienced, however the tone of the objective section is not assertive enough. He should not “hope to be able to fit in and quickly learn the ropes to become a valuable member of the vessel team” . He should state

“My extensive experience in the merchant navy is easily transferable to the luxury yachting industry. I have the attributes required to operate a large yacht as captain (or first officer in the other CV), am able to communicate professionally with owners, guests and yacht managers and can manage a large and diverse crew.”

About myself

There is too much information here and it seems that there is no real cohesion; personal characteristics are mixed up with facts and skills in no specific order. There are nine bullet points about personal characteristics. This is too much; our candidate should list no more than three personal characteristics or qualities, so he will need to pick and choose the most relevant ones. Additionally, hidden in the middle of these bullet points we have facts. This section is too mixed up and in fact could be disposed of altogether. The three chosen personal attributes can be integrated into the objective section at the top of the CV, which could then be renamed “objectives and profile”. The facts can be added to the additional skills and achievements section at the end of the CV. In deleting this section we gain space and straight away the CV is easier to read.

Employment history

This section is important and should not be at the bottom of the page.
Generally speaking, it is not appropriate to mention the nationality of the crew working onboard the vessels. This information should be deleted wherever it is mentioned.

This section is otherwise fine.

Hobbies and interests

I like the sense of humour shown here – “no fish is safe anywhere!”

My final comments are that a CV should not contain too much private information, so it is enough to have “married” for marital status, without going into details; also, there is no need to mention being social drinker or an occasional smoker, this is not a selling point for him so he should remove this information.

Magazine The Crew Report