CV surgery 8

In the first of what is to become a regular feature for “The Crew Report’, LaurenceReymann of YPI Crew has reviewed the c.v. of a superyacht crew member seeking work. Laurence has a great deal of experience in recruitment, both in yachting and the City in London. She will be explaining where people often go […]

In the first of what is to become a regular feature for “The Crew Report’, LaurenceReymann of YPI Crew has reviewed the c.v. of a superyacht crew member seeking work. Laurence has a great deal of experience in recruitment, both in yachting and the City in London. She will be explaining where people often go wrong on their c.v. in both presentation and content, and where you can make yourself stand out from the crowd for all the right reasons. This month Laurence is looking at the resum of a deckhand with a little previous experience.

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A c.v. is your marketing tool and as such it has to represent you in a clear and concise fashion, which is exactly what our deckhand’s c.v. is achieving. First impression counts! If I do not have an idea of who the candidate is and what he or she does within ten seconds, I will lose interest and will not be inclined to read further. I know it’s tough, but do take your time in writing your c.v.: make sure it grabs my attention!

The general look of the c.v.

The picture is good: a big smile, the hair is neat and tidy, no sunglasses, I see a happy face, perfect. The candidate uses a good font, easy to read, the headings are underlined, and so are the names of the yachts. All this makes for easy, stress free, flowing reading. I am happy! As far as the content is concerned it is generally very good.

Contact Details: This is very well presented; I can quickly pick them out which is VITAL!
Capabilities and Goals: The candidate’s last point should be the first and should be partly rewritten. Straight away I should be able to see the passage: “I am looking to gain a position as a Deckhand…” This is important information, the reason I am reading the c.v., and so it should come first. An employer or captain needs to feel reassured that you are the best person for a given job; “in order to further my knowledge of the industry by learning from those around me”: this last sentence offers no added value and offers no reassurance (the candidate wants training but is not giving anything). “As I feel that with my previous boating experience driving small pleasure craft (I took this from his personal interest section) in New Zealand and exposure to discerning clients in a prestigious golf course I have a lot to offer” would be better suited. This is added value and is a selling point, you have something to offer!

Employment History: This section is well presented. The candidate has very little yachting experience but takes the time to develop on the critical deckhand duties. However, he has forgotten to mention the size of M/Y Elizabeth F, which he needs to add.

Personal Interests/Hobbies: Whilst this section is long, it is of acceptable length and we discover a very sporty person who also plays the guitar. Interesting.

This is overall a very good c.v. as it gives a good picture of the candidate, good work!

Magazine The Crew Report