The Chief Stewardess CV

  RUNNING THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT DEMANDS FOCUS, AND IT IS A COMPETITIVE MARKET. BE SURE TO STAY ON TRACK WHEN PRESENTING YOUR CV. This month We are looking at the CV of a chief stewardess. The market for this role is very competitive and as always a well presented CV will make the difference in […]

 

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RUNNING THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT DEMANDS FOCUS, AND IT IS A COMPETITIVE MARKET. BE SURE TO STAY ON TRACK WHEN PRESENTING YOUR CV.

This month We are looking at the CV of a chief stewardess. The market for this role is very competitive and as always a well presented CV will make the difference in obtaining an interview with the captain. This month’s rsum is well presented so instead of highlighting what can be improved we will look at what makes it good. Of course, there are going to be one or two points that can be improved but the big picture is that this CV works. I feel confident that our candidate will be called for interviews. A CV is a delicate balance between presentation and content and often less is more. As you know by now, a CV needs to get to the point quickly; the quicker a captain can read and absorb the information, the better.

IMPACT EARLY

In the introduction the writer/candidate needs to make a big impact. The statement needs to be sharp and contain powerful descriptions of the candidate’s skills and personality. Starting the paragraph with “I am honest…” does not make a powerful statement and this represents one of the very few weakness of this CV. Would anybody want to hire a dishonest person? Of course not. The attribute of being honest is a prerequisite and as such should not be mentioned. Put yourself in the shoes of the captain/ employer and write down a description of the chief stewardess/ candidate they are looking for. The closer your match to these criteria, the more likely you will be called for an interview.

BE CONFIDENT & ARTICULATE

“Hard working” and “enthusiastic” are both good … but maybe we can find something even better. Creative problem solver? Task orientated? Resilient? Excellent interpersonal skills? Leads by example? Decisive? Service orientated? Or course this is not in order to make false statements about who you are and I am not suggesting you overstep the line of honesty but blow your own trumpet a bit and emphasise your good points. As always, one does not write a CV in five minutes, so take the time to think about who you are and make a list. In this paragraph our candidate has put the most important words “chief stewardess” last. Again, this does not make much of an impact. I have to read too much text before I get to what I want to know.
A more astute way is to start with the obvious. For example: “A service orientated and resilient chief stewardess…” Here we are a lot more concise and to the point. Don’t forget that a CV must also allow you to compete against other candidates, so your CV has to be better then the competition. The idea is that you become the ideal candidate for the job. The qualifications section is good; our candidate has lots to offer she has two bachelor degrees and various skills to offer.

STAY FOCUSED

The previous yachting experience section is easy to read. Our candidate has added a job description for each yacht, which is good. One point needs rewriting though: “There is always time for a laugh and a joke” in the first paragraph. This falls outside the scope of a CV and has no place here. A CV is not a forum to express emotions; it is about “cold” facts and achievements. It is about how you make things happen and not about what is happening to you. As we have seen, there are only a few points that need work, though. It is looking good and almost there. Best of luck to our cand